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cjddad
Member

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, December 24, 2004 - 10:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Myself,wife and grandkids(two through seven)would like to spend a week or so on a rented houseboat on Temagami.There would be seven of us all together.We would like to tow my canoe.When is the best time? Taking into considering bugs,crowded conditions ect.We were considering the fourth of July. Can someone provide the E-mail of a houseboat rental co.? Thanks Dennis
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blitz_boy
Member

Post Number: 17
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Friday, December 24, 2004 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I think there are 2 operators on L Temagami

www.lakelandthreebuoys.com

www.leisureisland.com

I have not used either one so perhaps someone else can advise.
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moose
Member

Post Number: 5
Registered: 04-2004
Posted on Saturday, January 1, 2005 - 4:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

camp ketchuneny lodge also has 2 houseboats for rent 705-237-8952
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robertsewellca
Member

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I tried the "Leisure Island" link but it was not available. Here is an image of a Leisure Island boat that my neighbour rented for a week during a family gathering. It looked great and was reported to be economical with regard to fuel consumption. Be sure to take some mosquito coils along.
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barbara
Member

Post Number: 11
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 1, 2005 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Try this link for Leisure Island Houseboat Rentals:
http://www.pvisuals.com/fishing/ontario/leisure_is land/leisure.html

Barbara
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fishinmusician
Member

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2004


Posted on Tuesday, May 24, 2005 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I've rented houseboats from Leisure Island many times and they have been great as far as comforts but they are ideally suited for three people and maximum five if you don't mind cozying up on the fold down beds.
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rob_grambau
Member

Post Number: 15
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Sunday, July 10, 2005 - 12:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I spent last week in a Threebuoys 40 foot houseboat, rented out of Temagami. In my group were three men, average age 47, two seniors and a 13 year old boy. I have some comments about the experience that others might find useful.

The boat was a nice size for the 6 of us. There were only two private sleeping spaces – a small bedroom on the main deck and a little crawl-space bedroom up a vertical ladder. The crawl-space bedroom can only be accessed by a flexible and coordinated person of average strength – perfect for older kids who can use a bunk bed but it would be very tough for anyone who was weak, disabled or inflexible. Once inside the crawl-space, the bedroom the ceiling was too low to sit up in bed. It is strictly for horizontal use and just enough headroom to get in and out – or possibly read a book while laying on your back or on your side. The main bedroom had a double bed that took up 90% of the room. There was a small closet and some drawers. But it had a door than closed and provided privacy! The remaining sleeping spots consisted of two large sofas that pulled out into beds and a dinette that converted into a bed. These converted beds were all double beds – about queen size, but shorter. The padding was pretty firm. Pulling out the sofa into a bed required some strength as they were built of heavy plywood with piano hinges. Putting them away was similarly challenging. I slept on the sofa and didn’t bother making it into a bed. Those of us sleeping in the converted beds had draw curtains, but they don’t give much actual privacy. Living on the boat was pretty much like living in a large RV motor home.

The galley was really great. The boat came with pots, pans, dinnerware and enough cupboard space. The stove was easy to use and effective. The oven worked and the refrigerator was very effective. The freezer kept things frozen solid with no problem. The toilet and shower were small but having the full bathroom was terrific. Odor from the sewage tank was not noticeable until after a week’s use by 6 people. The shower worked but was tiny and we all simply washed up in the lake using biodegradable soap. The lake water is warm this year. It is easy to simply wash your hair by kneeling over the tub and using the flexible shower hose- like washing your hair over a sink.

The barbeque grill on the front deck worked well and we ate grilled food a few times.

The boat could be piloted (steered and controlled) from either inside the cabin or up on the flying bridge. You can be sun-burned to a CRISP on the flying bridge. Watch out – even on a cloudy day.

The boat had a top useable speed of about 6 miles per hour, slower in the wind and, because it is basically a pontoon barge, the more wind you had, the harder it was to keep it going straight. Navigating close to rocks in the wind is no job for an amateur. We stayed out in the middle of the channels. Finding a place to pull ashore at night was not easy. Witch Bay and the North shore of Ferguson Bay have sandy beaches and are guaranteed good places to start. After tying up the boat a few times, more challenging spots could be tried.

Getting the boat out again, against wind blowing more than 15 mph is a severe challenge. The boat can be blown sideways easily, then pinned against the shore with no way to lower the stern drive propeller and fire up the engine. Using these boats in the wind requires thinking and planning ahead, listening to weather reports for future wind speeds and conditions, etc. The marine radio provided is able to receive continuous weather reports in French and English. Plan to find a mooring spot upwind where the shoreline shelters a place of relative calm water.

It also helps to make friends with the other houseboaters out on the lake and keep in touch with them on the marine radio. During out trip, we pulled another Threebuoys boat out of a situation where their anchor that was not coming up easily and heavy wind was blowing the anchor rope so tight that the young women on board couldn’t manage it. They called us on the radio and we came over and helped.

It helps to have several strong people aboard who are willing to jump into the water and maneuver the boat, pushing, pulling, etc. The boat is easy-as-pie when the wind is not blowing! But the wind can turn the boating experience into a challenge that can border on a nightmare for the inexperienced person who moored on a rocky shore only to wake up to a dramatic shift in wind direction and wind speed.

The inboard engine ran flawlessly but produced quite a bit of vibration at maximum speed and much less vibration at about 2/3 speed – and not much loss of speed either. The engine uses about 1.5 gallons of gas per hour. Not bad at all. We drove the boat many hours during the week, going 2 to 6 hours at a time. We ended up with a gas bill of about $260 Canadian, including all taxes, etc. This included 6 gallons of oil/gas mix for the fishing boat we rented and towed along behind. This cost is more a reflection of the cost of gas in Canada than any thirstiness of the engine.

The mosquitoes were unbelievable. Bad. They came out at any time of the day, but mostly at dusk. The 30 year old sliding screens and windows on the boat did not keep them out, just reduced their numbers. We always put on bug repellant before going to bed. I think any boat is going to encounter mosquitoes on the lake. Canadian mosquitoes put New York mosquitoes to shame. They are the heavy-weight champions of mosquitoes. They can fly aggressively into a head-wind and still land on you with skill. I used the new Botanicals cream that had Eucalyptus oil – it worked very well, was creamy and not greasy, smelled OK, didn’t stain my clothing, and was evaporated away by morning. I never used DEET. The Botanicals repellant was effective and pleasant.

So. If the wind isn’t blowing, it’s all peaches and cream. If it is windy, stay on the beach at Ferguson until it calms down. Keep in touch with the other house-boaters. If you can bring a portable GPS with Topo Canada on it, GREAT! You will never be lost. The boat comes with a shoals-map, but the GPS makes navigating idiot-proof. I used a Garmin 60CS. I highly recommend it, especially with the suction-cup mounting bracket and the 12 volt car power-cord. An external antenna is not necessary on the fiberglass boat.
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mdprus
Member

Post Number: 21
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Monday, July 11, 2005 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi Rob,

I would just mention that bio-degradable soap requires bacteria in the soil to degrade and so using it to wash up in the lake makes it no friendlier to the environment than regular soaps.
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rob_grambau
Member

Post Number: 19
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, July 11, 2005 - 4:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Dear mdprus,

Unfortunately, the packaging did not mention that fact. I tried to do something that was environmentally friendly. Next year, we will wash in the boat and pump the gray water out at the end of the trip. Unless you know of a product that can be safely used in the lake.

Thanks for the heads-up.

Rob
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markdog
Member

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Sunday, July 31, 2005 - 4:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Me and 5 or 6 friends (all men late 30's, friends for 25 years) are heading up to Temagami in mids August. We rented a houseboat from Canusa Vacations, they have always been good to deal with. (4th time in the last 6-7 years) We have always had great luck with their 44' Three Buoys houseboats. Boats are clean and reliable. The outdrive is caged (nice to know when you are anchoring in high winds).
Our 2 main objectives are
1) relax and enjoy the beauty of Temagami (not to get away from the women we will miss them the moment we leave the house?!)
2) catch some fish

We usually troll for lakers with downriggers morning till night. Never skunked. Caught a 30 pounder 2 years ago. We have always fished in the Ferguson's Bay area. We have tried Cross Bay one year for 1/2 a day without luck) This year we are renting a 14' boat and motor to pull behind to give us more fishing options. (bass, walleye)

Can anyone recommend lake trout, bass, walleye spots south of the access road landing? We usually go north on the lake, seems quieter with less traffic but catching fish is important. ( I want the fishing trophy this year!)

Also some of us will be camping in tents at night. Is the fire ban still on?

Great site and thanks for any advise.

Mark
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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 439
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Sunday, July 31, 2005 - 6:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yes, the ban is on. Barely a drizzle so far. Watch the Temagami front page at http://www.ottertooth.com/tem_index.htm for news.
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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 440
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - 9:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

But, while the heat is up, the flies are down!
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markdog
Member

Post Number: 2
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - 2:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Pic of laker from 2 years ago in Furguson Bay. Did not have a proper scale but the lenght and girth put it around 30 lb.

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