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Ottertooth Forums * Temagami canoe routes & backcountry travel * Archive through August 17, 2010 * GPS- Campsites < Previous Next >

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johnmillsbro
Member

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 8:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I was curious if anyone has a GPS topo with Campsites locations for Temagami. Or does anyone know if such a thing is available?
Thanks
John
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sjfwhite
Member

Post Number: 4
Registered: 07-2010


Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 2:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I found a gpx file at http://www.perfectway.net/ that has an awful lot of campsites and portages marked in Temagami. I actually ordered a new GPS last night for my upcoming trip (the maps for Garmin topo Canada v.4 with this waypoint file won't fit on my old GPSMAP 60). My new toy should arrive on Monday!

(Message edited by sjfwhite on July 16, 2010)
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johnmillsbro
Member

Post Number: 4
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 3:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Awesome find. Do people ever post gpx files on the forum?

thanks
John
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 94
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 4:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I was trained in the army to use a topo map and a compass. That was almost thirty years ago. Maps need no batteries, you can fan a fire with them folded properly, they are fun to pore over and discuss and they are a link to a history of cartography.
Finding campsites is easy...paddle the lake and look for them. Sorry guys, just the way I feel.
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johnmillsbro
Member

Post Number: 6
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 5:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

No prob. My goal is to not have to use the GPS to find my way... but rather just in case....

Must admit I do like the idea recording trips, adding interesting waypoints. When I am old and lose my recollection of temagami I will still be able to find that old water fall or campsite I once visisted....Maybe my children will someday take the same route I took 30 years before...who knows...

(Message edited by johnmillsbro on July 16, 2010)
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sjfwhite
Member

Post Number: 5
Registered: 07-2010


Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 6:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I love using the GPS to judge my speed and to try to beat the ETA that the GPS calculates. :-)
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 95
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 6:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Just out of curiosity, when you are using a GPS, how do you look at a large view, say 20 km on 20 km??
Isn't the screen too small to see any detail except when zoomed in close?
So how do you "see" the lay of the land? If I am going down a river, the next kilometer is very important, but no more important than the next thirty kilometers and I want to know what I am getting into before I commit, particularly with rivers.
So...never having used them, is it a matter of repeated "small" views of the topography, or is there some feature I am not aware of that solves this?
They should make a GPS projector you can shine onto a tent or tarp wall and then you could see the whole area....and watch movies at night. I may market that.
Cheers and happy paddling.
P.S.-my friends and I write in journals, take photos and compile trip books that tell the story of the whole trip. From planning, menus, routes, distances, photos along the way and the written narrative which is usually profane and very entertaining.
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sjfwhite
Member

Post Number: 6
Registered: 07-2010


Posted on Friday, July 16, 2010 - 8:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

LOL - good question, fireman! On my 7 year old GPS, the screen is really small and the map shown is even smaller (because of other data shown on the screen). Consequently, detail is displayed only when zoomed quite far in and, when zoomed out, it really just shows your position relative to the lake or portage you are on, as well as the larger contour lines. The new GPS I ordered has a larger, colour screen, which shows much higher detail when zoomed out and can show contours more clearly. You can even create custom maps using google maps which show the actual satellite imagery. When it boils right down to it, though, topos and compasses (used by someone knowledgeable) are just as good. I like not having to haul the map out, mess with folding it and refolding it, as well as being able to answer the question "how long until we get there?" by saying "if you keep paddling at this rate - 4 hours - but if you paddle as hard as I am, then 2 hours". :-)

(Message edited by sjfwhite on July 16, 2010)

(Message edited by sjfwhite on July 16, 2010)
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 96
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Sunday, July 18, 2010 - 7:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yes, well the issue of lilydippers transcends all concerns of technology. No map or GPS will ever solve the problem of someone who has not accepted the harsh reality of how a canoe is propelled forward through our world.
Perhaps one of the reasons there are fewer married couples out there than in say, the shopping malls of our fine country. Although the ones that are, seem to work it out. I simply tell my wife she is doing a great job and I enjoy doing 90% of the work.
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kayamedic
Member

Post Number: 25
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Sunday, July 18, 2010 - 11:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I use map and GPS for two different purposes. When I want very fine detail I go to the GPS and scale down to what I want. Usually I want to see about 1:7500. Far more detail than 1:50000 or at least easier for me to read.

For the big picture the standard 1:50000 paper or Tyvek maps are best.

I can get by without a GPS. They are a convenience.
I cannot get by without a paper map. They are an essential.

Newer GPS come with an electronic compass. Be sure to have an ordinary handheld too in your PFD.
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yellowcanoe
Member

Post Number: 69
Registered: 01-2010


Posted on Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

As an FYI, I used some of the GPS co-ordinates from the site referenced above last weekend and I found that in our limited route (Obabika, Shish-Kong, Bob, Diamond, Wakimika) that some of the co-ordinates were wrong, inaccurate, or non-existent (e.g. Shish Kong, Obabika). User beware. I love the GPS, but halfway through the trip, I put it away and turned to map and compass, a big thing considering I have no natural navigation abilities.



(Message edited by yellowcanoe on August 3, 2010)
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preacher
Member

Post Number: 153
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

It's nice to have an idea where campsites are. That's only nice if the resource is reliable. Otherwise it's potentially dangerous.

I've had maps that were so very wrong, campsites marked where there's a cliff and no access anywhere from the water.
Avoid the Backroad Maps, I've seen them mis-mark portages above falls & rapids, campsites & whole islands. That level of error is just too dangerous to mess with.
I have found the Chrismar maps to be reliable.

A GPS is a great thing, but it does not replace map&compass with the skill to use them. The skill isn't difficult. I like my GPS for noting where I spent the night so I can plot on a map if I ever get around to doing that. Also great when bushwacking, helps to have a breadcrumb trail to get back.

I too like to explore and discover sites, scanning the shore for likely candidates. Never take the first approach you see. Go around, scout. Twice I got burned by not taking the extra time. Once was a steep hill with a deep drop in the water, around the island was an easy shallow spot. The other time was near the dunes on LE; one side was all sharp rocks & driftwood, the other was a sandy beach.
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blindeye
Member

Post Number: 3
Registered: 07-2010
Posted on Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 10:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

When you use a GPS unit with a map, make sure the GPS is set for the same map datum as the map (ie NAD27, NAD83, WGS84, etc.) otherwise you could be out a couple hundred metres or more in some cases. Like others, I enjoy using my GPS to record my track for the day and mark my campsites and plot it all out at the end of the trip. I always have a map and compass with me to complement the GPS.
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sjfwhite
Member

Post Number: 18
Registered: 07-2010


Posted on Monday, August 9, 2010 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

The key really is to have maps that are properly calibrated. On the first day of my recent trip, I mistakenly had a road map enabled on my device at the same time as the topo map and the road map was displayed instead of the topo. All the backcountry waypoints were off by 500m. Once I disabled the road map so that only the topo was visible, everything was very accurate.
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simplyred
Member

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2010 - 6:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Use the GPS always, only print up maps if needed. The GPS is great technology for outdoor enthusiast, I wouldn't be without it now.
By the way,
I've only got some campsite waypoints for Obabika out that way. And tracks all the way to Ishpatina or Maple Mountain.

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