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Ottertooth Forums * Temagami canoe routes & backcountry travel * Archive through January 25, 2007 * Ed Macpherson is back < Previous Next >

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brian
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Post Number: 572
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 9:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I am surprised to see you on the forum this morning. Aren't you supposed to be swatting blackflies?
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 307
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 3:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

It didn't happen.
Since early April, I have been suffering from, an unexplained, mobility problem such that I can not lift or carry my canoe.
I spent 2 weeks on Obabika in various places and called it quits last Monday, 15th.
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kim
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Post Number: 153
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 7:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Keyboard-itis?

How will you make it up to Pepper Ed?
You may have to take the pooch to Wonderland now.
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tsm
Member

Post Number: 62
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 9:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed
Sorry to hear that. Hope things get better.
Kim...thanks for the chuckle! :-)
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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 573
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 11:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed, hopefully this is temporary.
Have you tried a tump stretcher? Bind your legs to a tree with a tumpline. Bind your hands with another and put it on Pepper. Then tell him to puuuulllll!
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otter_mel
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Post Number: 42
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,
I hope you recover your equilibrium soon so that we can tease you at the fall gathering
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 308
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 12:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks for the kind comment TSM.

As to you other two T-----s, go and gobble somewhere else.
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kim
Moderator

Post Number: 154
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 2:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

How about here?

http://www.nwtf.org/

My brother in law works for these guys.
He is a professional turkey killer....and he gets paid to do it!
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 309
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 7:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

otter_mel;

I will try to be at the Fall Gathering.

Where are you going this summer?Thlewiaza?

As you know I am supposed to be in Wabakimi in July and on the Albany in August, but I am becoming less hopeful as time progresses.

Regards, Ed.
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hillbilly
Member

Post Number: 186
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 10:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,
I hope you recover soon and are able to be on the water this summer as you have planned. Hope to see you at the Fall Gathering, no one else can run Cranky Point the way you do. Ha, Ha.

Bill
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canoebear
Member

Post Number: 346
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 4:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

"Reinspect"

'Tis a deversion to trip solo,
into an unfriendly region wher
refreshen cool breezes appear ther,
carrien plenty of feathered-birds
clamorous overhead, while paddlen
in tha blue crystal-clear thaw.
A journey designated-end to
bring-on, a harmony with nature,
into 1's camp, be no mishap.
Thou quiet canoe escape be short-lived,
be glad U + Pepper Shaker kept
heads above glacial waters.
Most special do all right, by 1's-self,
'tis that U wer able to over-come &
master tha wrechedness of a rough carry-out.
Re-bound, so to re-enter watery woods agin,
Heya ed!

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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 312
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 5:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Canoebear:
We did not canoe on these ice cold rivers this year and did not fall into the glacial waters, always a hazard at this time of the season and it can happen in a split second. So far I have been lucky in my escapades and having tipped on these glacial rivers several times I have also been able to get to shore quickly. Maybe the cold waters will have a chance to get at me again next year, if I am fortunate enough to be able to travel out on the land as the ice retreats from the lakes and rivers.
My two good friends, one from Obabika and one from Kitchener knew of my problems and knew where I was camping. They visited me at about 8:00PM on Saturday night, May 6th bringing much "canned grog" to quench my thirst, as I enjoyed the solitude of Obabika.They did this on an evening when it was so cold that your breath froze solid and fell out of the air, like ice cubes, before it was a foot away from you.The Pepper Shaker made her greetings to these 2 travellers and went into the tent burying herself under my sleeping bag, as we warmed ourselves by a fire that Kim had lit and Alex had found wood for. Alex had disappeared into the bush and reappeared carrying a large log under each arm. He told us that he had cut some wood from the adjacent site and left a bit of it there, retreiving it for our fire. He said that we were at Toboggon Point, a campsite on the West side of Obabika at the South end of the big Bay, that has been visited by many before us and has scratching's on the rocks made by young campers that dated back to 1946.These markings must have been young American's from Keeywaydin or thereabouts who had travelled at that time.His Grandfather had got stranded there a long time ago leaving his toboggon as the ice went out.He went to retreive it later in the summer only to find it's remains in the camp fire pit. Someone had decided that it would make good fuel.All that was left of it were a few screws that had been used to hold pieces together. Hence it's name...Toboggon Point.
My friends had come down from further up the Lake using a small boat with a very small motor. as they left at 10:00PM the wind suddenly changed, coming from the South as they travelled North. I could only here the sound of their engine for a few minutes.I prayed to the Great Spirit that they would arrive back at their destination safely.

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paul_hammersten
Member

Post Number: 238
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 9:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi Ed...yes...' re-bound ' soon!

And thanks for the story.

" canned grog " ?


AND THE CREWS CAROUSE AT RUPERT HOUSE



" Oh! the fur-fleets sing on Timiskaming

As the ashen paddles bend,

And the crews carouse at Rupert House

At the sullen winter’s end. "

From the poem " The Old Canoe "

in TOILERS OF THE TRAIL

by George T. Marsh

- 1921 -



You know how it is when the trip is over, the money you’ve been packing around in the bush for a week or two or three is burning a big hole in your pocket, you have the night off, your pals are already down at the Alibi and it’s Saturday night!

My childhood heroes the Voyageurs would have understood for they enjoyed a ‘ good smoke ‘, as I wrote in my story THREE SMOKES, and heavy drinking and rowdy behavior before and after their canoe trips was an accepted way of life for many of them.

To tell you I didn’t welcome a little carousing in my day would be a whopper of a ‘ campfire lie ‘!

Looking back I have no regrets. Well one...that I wasn’t in the Alibi that night during hunting season when the door flew open and Buckwheat, with a wide toothless grin, stumbled in under his heavy burden then proceeded to plop his tumpline and its load, a black bear carcass, on the sawdust floor.

Drinking while paddling is an altogether different story. The Voyageurs did not mix canoeing and drinking and neither did I...but once.

The summer of 1970 I was working with a make shift half way house on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in South Eastern Montana. This was back in the time small ranches still covered the foothills of the Big Horn Mountains.

The half way house was an old trailer and a large circus tent near my cabin. A dozen men slept in the tent. The trailer was used for a kitchen and a leather workshop.


My Northern Cheyenne friend and mentor, the late Frederick Dale Seminole, was in charge of the workshop. In my cabin down by the Tongue River [ River Of Tongues as my Cheyenne friends called it referring to how the ripples of water on the surface of the river ‘ lapped ‘ in the sunlight ] Freddie taught me the ABC’s of my art which I work to this day.

My cabin was across from the Ashland Powwow Grounds. It was the farthest one down by the river nested all alone in a stand of cottonwood trees.

In the cool gray time before the dawn, longing to be canoeing as I had the previous ten summers, I embarked on what was soon to become a disaster of a trip.

A drizzle of rain was falling and a bank of river mist hung in the trees out back of my cabin. On a willow that branched out over the water, I tied a faded red bandana. I then got into my truck and drove down the dirt river road to Birney Village.

We planned to canoe the river, the eastern boundary of the Reservation, northward with the current from the village back to the take out place marked by my bandana. We figured we could easily complete the trip in a day.

This trip was my friend Tucker’s, John Red Breath - Yellow Hair, idea. Tucker knew I was missing my usual summer canoeing through the North Woods, so he told me about the skin boats the Cheyenne used on the rivers in the old days. The boats were each made of a single green buffalo hide, therefore having no seams and further waterproofed with buffalo fat, that was fastened over a willow frame.

We didn’t have a buffalo hide to make a skin boat but we did have a rubberized canvas canoe recently bought in a department store in Billings some three and a half miles off the Reservation.

When I got to Birney Village the canoe was already beached down by the riverside The cleansing summer rain had stopped and the day promised to be hot and humid.

Five of us got into the canoe along with our day packs, a cooler filled with ice and our lunch, two six packs of soda and two of beer. The beer wasn’t my idea. I knew better than to mix alcoholic beverages with canoeing but I didn’t protest. We were five adults on a holiday, responsible only for ourselves and each other. I knew the river was neither deep nor wide and it’s bottom was sandy with smooth pebbles.

We planned on easily drifting with the lazy current the entire way back to my cabin while taking turns with the two oars to steer the canoe and keep it in the main current of the river.

Sometimes the bow became the stern and the stern became the bow. I wondered what my hard core voyageur pals would have said if they could have seen me then as I paddle dipped in the river while singing out a summer trip song for the herons nestled in the tree tops, " Oh those lazy, hazr, crazy days of summer. Those days of camping, canoeing and cheer! "

It soon became hot so we took turns jumping overboard to cool off in the water. It was still morning when we passed around the sodas and beer.

Trinidad entertained us with a rendition of his favorite " party " song - one he always played on the juke box out in the Wagon Wheel roadhouse on Saturday nights when the local cowboys came to town. " Pop a top again my friend. Fill it up to the brim. Pop a top again my friend. My sorrows will dim. "

Trini’s singing was created with a burst of ‘ hee, haw’s ‘ and a chorus of can top popping.

Up around the bend a fallen cottonwood tree ruck out several feet onto the river. Before any of us saw it our canoe smacked right into the tree trunk and abruptly came to a dead stop. A branch punctured then ripped a huge tear in the left side of the canoe which completely collapsed plunging everyone and everything into the water.

No one was singing and laughing now!

The river became a confusion of floundering people, clothing, day packs and cans of soda and beer, full and empty, bobbing up and down in the water.

I watched Little Sister float by me in the current straight towards the tree. The back of her head was submerged in the water and she was barely able the get enough air to breath.

To this day a cold shiver runs up my spine as I shudder to think what would have happened to Little Sister if her head had not cleared the downed tree by a fraction of an inch allowing her to pass under it.

Fortunately we all made it safely to shore.

For many years to come my faded red bandana continued to wave in the breeze down by the river behind my cabin, like a spirit offering placed by one of my Cheyenne friends.

Many years have now passed. I’m older and wiser and proud to say, with " a little help from my friends ", I haven’t had any alcoholic drink since the Fall of 1980.

While I don’t expect others to follow my lead, I do hope those who read my story would not drink and canoe. The effects of alcoholic consumption on a canoeist are many - dehydration leading to heat and sun stroke, loss of concentration and coordination, fatigue, reduced reaction time and impaired judgement.

Even though it is illegal today to drink while canoeing on many rivers and lakes, roughly ½ of the reported canoeing accidents involve the consumption of alcoholic beverages before or during canoeing and the American Canoeing Association reports " at least 25% of the victims in fatal canoeing accidents are believed to have consumed alcohol immediately prior to the accident ".

Best

The ' Turtle '

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otter_mel
Member

Post Number: 43
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 7:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,
I posted my reply on Friday but it disappeared for some reason.
Here it is again:
For now Steel River is planned for early September and then the gathering.
I did the Minesing swamp loop in April and Massasauga P.P. last weekend (Spider Lake)
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otter_mel
Member

Post Number: 44
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 8:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,
I stayed at that big bay site on Obabika a couple of times and have walked along the shore westward to almost the end. It is a great site for September with north view for Aurora Borealis (should it happen) and you can lie on warm flat slabs of rock and enjoy the view.
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 313
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 7:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

otter_mel:
I was there on May 2 and on for almost a week.The weather during the first few days of May was awesome with almost no wind and no clouds with temperatures into the high 20's.I spent Wednesday morning paddling around the shore of the Bay into all of it's nooks and cranies.In all the years I have travelled on Obabika, it was the first time I had gone into the Bay, visiting all of the Islands in there.

In the afternoon I travelled down into the Lower Lake to the East side where an old logging road comes out at the end of a Bay. This road is shown on the Canoe route Planning Map as coming up from Emerald Lake.It goes between Upper Bass and Allan Lakes then branches in both directions.It is shown as being gated.I think this is the access road the WNAG was/is?? trying to open up to get into Obabika Lake.With the exception of the first 150 feet near the Lake, the road was an easy walk and I could have driven my van along it with no problems.I went along it to where it comes out at Upper Bass Lake and found the remants of a hunt camp structure,that had been left standing along with an overturned motorboat on the shore.The site fireplace had many glass and can remnants in it.

In the 2 weeks I spent on Obabika,apart from my Saturday evening visitors, I saw one kayakker, travelling North to Pine Point while I was at Ranger Point. I spoke with him the next morning as he travelled South. It seems he had taken the train from Guelph to Temagami, stayed the night in town leaving the following morning in a rented kayak and travelled to Obabika that day. He passed by Ranger Point at about 4PM. I think that must be about a distance of 40km including one portage.
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ed
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Post Number: 314
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 8:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Paul, that was quite a story you told us and as always superbly written.
Thanks for sharing it with us.
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paul_hammersten
Member

Post Number: 239
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 1:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi Ed

Glad to hear you enjoyed my story.

I have written alot of them and have put them together in my new book along with other writings not necessarily about canoeing.

Many of the canoeing storys I wrote for a fellow who posted here on this web sit. He wanted stories that were not only intertaining but educational...about canoeists in trouble etc.

I sent him ten stories for a book he said he was going to publish but never heard from him again.

So...I figured... who needs him!

I will tell you all about the book and post some more stories here when they fit into a thread.

Here is the story THREE SMOKES I mentioned in my story above. I was happy to learn from my old canoe tripping camp that they will publish THREE SMOKES in the next edition of their alumni magazine.

THREE SMOKES


“ Trois pipes, some twelve miles, of lusty paddling in the cool morning brought respite and breakfast...”

THE VOYAGEUR
By Grace Lee Nute
- 1931 -


My Shaw & Tenney ashen trip paddle now rests crossed with Dad’s ‘ ancient ‘ six foot Old Town beaver tail paddle high on the river rock chimney above the fireplace.

During the ‘ long snows ‘ of winter, I enjoy sitting by the fire re-reading the colorful tales of the Voyageurs I read as a child in the books my father handed down to me. It was these same yarns by George T. Marsh, James Oliver Curwood, Stewart Edward White and others that first evoked in me a longing to paddle in the wake of the Voyageurs.

As you may know from reading my own stories, my childhood dream came true, for I paddled, poled, and portaged throughout the ‘ Regions of the Northwest Wind, Keewaydin ‘ during the twilight of the era of the wood and canvas canoe.

My travels were much different from those of the Voyageurs. Although some trips were long, rough and at times dangerous, my canoeing life was easier than that of The Voyageurs of old. For example, the food rations of the Voyageur were quite meager - boiled peas and pork for breakfast, while I was trained by my first trip leader on just how to plan, pack and cook in order to eat well in the bush.

A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way and shows the way. I was fortunate to always have the means to follow Charlie’s lead. Those who were privileged to trip with the late Dunmore Keewaydin great, Charlie Horner, will forever remember his sticky buns and fried onion rings!

Charlie even had a way of showing me how to find joy in the daily trip task of locating, felling, sawing, splitting and stacking the chest high pile of dry red cedar necessary to feed his hungry reflector oven fire.

The voyageurs of old had to paddle ‘ three pipes ‘ before they stopped for breakfast. With Charlie, shortly after dawn, we always had a memorable feed, while still managing to be on the water long before the rising of the wind and the heat of the day.

Like the Voyageurs, however, we did measure our time and distance on the water by ‘ smokes ‘. To the Voyageur and to us one ‘ pipe or smoke ‘ meant roughly four miles, one hour, of paddling followed by a short rest and smoke.

When I come across pictures of Charlie among the hundreds of priceless trip slides and photographs he took since 1955 that were passed on down to me, almost always they show him drawing a ‘ good smoke ‘ with his favorite pipe.

When I canoed the Rangeley Lakes in Maine with Charlie in August of 1961 and again in July of ‘ 62, and when I went with him on Dunmore Keewaydin’s first canoe trip in La Verendrye Pac, Quebec July 31 - August 14, 1962, I didn’t smoke during rest stops. By the time I tripped Algonquin Park, Ontario with Charlie the month of August 1966, a full trips supply of cigarettes sealed in a waterproof bag was the first thing I packed in my duffle!

In the years to come, I was sure to take a break from paddling each hour long enough to have a ‘ good smoke ‘, as Charlot would say, just as the Voyageurs of old took their ‘ pipes ‘.

However, by the end of the 1976 Mistassibi River Trip, Quebec, I had a parting of the ways with my childhood heroes the Voyageurs. I tell this story not to point the finger at anyone, including myself, but to help another who might find himself or herself in the same trouble I did.

On Friday June 18th, 1976 I helped Seth begin the process of packing almost 1000 lbs. Of food for the Mistassibi Trip. By Thursday the 24th all the trippers had arrived. After “ 3 busy training days of poling, paddling { and swimming } in the Otter Creek and Middlebury River, sorting and packing [ including my months supple of cigarettes ], hurrying,and waiting “ we left the shores of Lake Dunmore, Vermont for the challenges of the Canadian Wilderness.

Seth Gibson, the trip leader, kept the 1976 Mistassibi Trip Journal. Seth became the long time Wilderness Trip Director and the guiding light of Keewaydin Wilderness Canoe Trips, Quebec.

On Tuesday June 29th we arrived at Baie de Poste “ and found Charlot waiting for us, looking great! “

Charlot Gunner, the famed Canadian Cree canoe man from Lake Mistissini, was our guide. When honored at the Wilderness Reunion at Dunmore Keewaydin in 1998, Keewaydin Wilderness Canoe Trips loyal friend had been their guide for thirty years and already paddled more than 8000 miles with Keewaydin trippers.

It was a trip of a lifetime for me to canoe with both Seth and his great friend Charlot together on the same trip.

The Mistassibi River Trip was hard but , as Seth’s final entry in his journal reads, “ From Charlot we have learned more in four weeks than one could learn in four months of school. I hope that working with us provided him some pleasure and entertainment too. His good humor and exuberance kept us going through the longest portages and the wettest days. Thank you Charlot! Au Revoir Mistassibi.”

I knew how hard the trip was for Charlot.

Seth’s journal entry for Thursday July 1, Charlot’s first full day with us, begins, “ Promptly at 6:45 Charlot coughed twice...”

Seth’s journal entry for the following morning begins, “ The sun rose at 4:00. Charlot coughed at 5. “

Charlot smoked cigarettes and every morning of the trip and during the night one could hear Charlot cough. I knew because I too would be awake with a cough of my own!

Even so, throughout the trip during each ‘ pipe, ‘ Charlot and I enjoyed a ‘ good smoke ‘ while the other trippers lifted their beaver tail paddle in the air, found the right angle, put their lips to the side edge of the blade and had a refreshing drink of cold northern water.

The ‘ toil of the trail ‘ and the years of ‘ pipes ‘ had taken their toll. Charlot and I may not have been ready to admit it but we knew we were in trouble on the Mistassibi. Thankfully our smoking did not create a hazard for the other trippers, [ There was the time my shirt pocket became unbuttoned and my plastic lighter fell overboard. I saw it floating in the water beside our canoe, bobbing up and down, as we navigated a rapid. When I reached to retrieve the lighter, I nearly capsized the canoe! ]

How much trouble I was in hit home when I reached into my duffle after arriving at the last campsite of the trip,. The final trip campfire is always a special time and this day I was especially excited for earlier that morning we spotted a moose swimming across the river. Seth wrote, “ Then we went flat out to cut him off. But the moose won. “ In these few minutes I relived the excitement I shared in my story “ A Moose Tail “ included in my book FORWARD KEEWAYDIN, To The Regions of the Homewind. I even thought that this might be the night to tell my yarn to others for the first time.

What a shock and total disappointment to discover the supply of cigarettes in my duffle was one pack short. I was out of ‘ good smokes ‘ to enjoy that evening as we gathered around the final campfire to swap our Voyageur tales!

Later I became so unnerved that finally I asked Charlot if I could bum a few cigarettes from him.

Charlot went into his tent then returned to the fire. He smiled and, with a special gleam in his eyes I shall never forget, he winked at me, gave me a whole pack of cigarettes and said “ smokes... not so good “!

Seth’s entry in his journal about our last evening by the river concludes, “ By 8 PM all is cleaned up and the worn out clothing is burned in the fire. { Charlie would approve }...The cold rain stays with us as we slow down and head for bed, last time in the bush! “

Well trained by Charlie Horner, we all had placed a clean change of cloths at the bottom of our duffles for the return trip back through civilization to Lake Dunmore.

We stopped in Saint Felicien to drop Charlot off to make his way home. One of the boys who had never smoked before bought a pack of cigarettes to be like two of his ‘ heroes ‘. I resolved then and there to give up my ‘ good smokes ‘. It took awhile but I finally stopped smoking. I wrote Seth the good news and he wrote back to tell me Charlot had already quit smoking.

In one of the letters he wrote to me with the help of his family, Charlot said , “ I’m hoping to make another trip with you ”.

The 1976 Mistassibi Trip would be the only time I canoed with Charlot. I wondered whether or not at the Wilderness Canoe Trip Reunion of 1998 he would recognize me amongst the hundreds of Keewaydin trippers he guided throughout the years. When I brought my wife over to his table for there first meeting, and so she could thank his wife sitting beside him for the beautifully embroidered runners she had made Sharon with smoked tanned moose hide and given to her as a wedding gift, with the same gleam in his eyes I remembered from an earlier day so many years ago, Charlot winked and said “ smokes not so good “.

Best
Paul
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 315
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 2:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Paul;
That fellow was likely Doug McKown, who has written a book entitled "Canoeing Safety and Rescue".He works as a paramedic in Banff Alberta and I suspect it will take him a while to get around to compiling the info.he may have received.
I usually try to re read parts of his book each year to refresh my memory about some of the rescue techniques he discusses.
Hopefully he will get back to you about what you sent to him.
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paul_hammersten
Member

Post Number: 240
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

That's the fellow Ed.

The stories he asked for were for another book like his UP THE CREEK : True Stories Of Canoeists In Trouble. Anyway the title is something like that...it has been many many moons... I thank him for motivating me to write.

Something may have happened to him...he did seem like a responsible guy.

It is best however that I have put the stories into my own book.

Best

Paul
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 316
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 3:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Paul:
Up the Creek is a book written by Kevin Callen, another Canadian Canoe book author.He spoke to us at the last Wilderness Canoe Symposium in Toronto using videos and had us rolling in the aisles with his self deprecating antics.
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tsm
Member

Post Number: 63
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 4:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed
I've been to about 4 or 5 of Kevin's presentations so far. Not only is he informative, but as you say, he puts a comical twist to all his stories....very entertaining!
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paul_hammersten
Member

Post Number: 241
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 6:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi Ed

Kevin's book sounds like a good read.

This is the UP THE CREEK I was refering to -

Up the Creek : True Stories of Canoeists in Trouble (ISBN: 0071390901)
Doug McKown
Book Description: International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press, 2004. Paperback.

Amazon lists the book with Chapter headings,rewiews etc.

Best

Paul

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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 317
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 6:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Paul:
Looks like you have got one I haven't heard of. I didn't know he had written one like that already.
thanks,
Ed.
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blackfox_dave
Member

Post Number: 64
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Wednesday, July 5, 2006 - 1:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi ya Ed how are you doing and hello from the uk I was talking about you today (allgood bud) and thought would take some time out to see if all is well in the woods with you hows the back I think you will have to train that dog to carry more gear this year.
Best to you an all on Ottertooth.
The Blackfox
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 329
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, July 5, 2006 - 1:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Blackfox:
Thanks for thinking about me.My back is doing not so bad and I am off to Wabikimi on Friday with my wife and dog.The dog carries only herself and the wife doesn't carry all that much either so I am thinking I am going to be doing a lot of portaging on this trip.

Regards,
Ed.
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blackfox_dave
Member

Post Number: 65
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 7:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Have a good trip Ed an keep them maps safe'an dry on this one.
I'll drop ya a email nextweek when I get back from paddling some Irish lakes.

All of our regards
The Blackfox

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