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Ottertooth Forums * Temagami canoe routes & backcountry travel * Archive through August 23, 2007 * Ed's back! < Previous Next >

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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 686
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Friday, May 18, 2007 - 7:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Good to have you back. How about giving us a trip report.
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alscool
Moderator

Post Number: 125
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 9:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I really like seeing trip reports from places I have been and pitched my tent. Sort of like living it all over again... vicariously through you Ed!! Thanks for posting your insightful narrative
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 85
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed/Alscool

I missed it!!! (Ed's trip report?)
Where is it???

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 435
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 2:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Click on Temagami at the top of this page and look in the News Briefs.
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 88
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 2:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Ed,

But there you go... I don't have "News Briefs"
the way mine is set-up... not at all saying that
it isnt around, just that the way my entrance works here (or is set-up by me), which I've suspected and others have suggested, is a little different
than others... I'll certainly find it, and yeah, Ed, I've been really looking forward to it... so
thanks.

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 436
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 5:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Sundown:
click on: http://www.ottertooth.com/Temagami/News/newsbriefs -067.htm#ma23b

Then at the bottom of that click on the colored bit that says trip log.
OK?
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 23
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, May 25, 2007 - 9:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,

Thanks for posting your trip report, although "no thanks" because now I've got a really, really bad itch to get back out in the wilderness.

Interesting that you didn't get dumped in the Sturgeon, that water surely would have been like ice! I was in Algonquin the 2nd week of May and in 8 days I managed to get a full "clean" in once ... in a little lake, shallow bay on a really hot and sunny day. The water might have been 6 degrees. Our last night was on Opeongo and I swear the water was right at the freezing point ... washing dishes made me numb.

Anyways, good to see you are back safe and sound. It does worry me that things have been so dry early this year, doesn't bode well for anyone planning a river trip later in the season. I may have to revise my trip plan to include more flatwater paddling unless the rain picks up over the next little while.

Burt
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 92
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Friday, May 25, 2007 - 9:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Ed

I found it last night, and got a chance at sunrise to read it... we're in a massive Birthday Mode in this household for a week so
my comments will be brief for now... but I cant
wait to dive in to your trip. Fascinating stuff, Ed... and brilliantly written... I felt like I was right there.

Little wry grin: I as well, have on one occasion
paddled "A Class 2, Upstream"!!! Let's see those young bucks pull that one off, eh?!!!!

(Sadly... mine was not a solo-trip, so the enlarged, framed photographic evidence adorns its
place-of-honour on a living room wall in Rotorua, New Zealand)

Thanks again, Ed, for the trip report.
And for your assistance finding it, which allowed me to re-set the way I added this site to my Favourites List. Problem solved.

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 437
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Friday, May 25, 2007 - 10:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Sundown:
You have to figure out that the main site is www.ottertooth.com and that the Forum is a subset of that site and Temagami is a subset etc.Once you see that it all falls in place.

Burtjames: I did dump on the Sturgeon about 3 Springs ago. A similar situation but on a different CII lower down the river.Instead of letting the canoe tip, I bailed out into the river and the canoe stayed upright, but took in some water.As it turned out I was at a spot where I was able to stand about waist deep, get up on a submerged rock and back into the canoe.All of that only took a few seconds but it seemed like a lifetime.And ... it was a warm sunny day so the cold water did not do me in.

The surprising thing is that the water warms up very quickly in the Spring if there are some hot sunny days.In the first 3 weeks of May it can go from numbing cold to somewhere where you might be tempted to go in for a quick in and out bath.
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 94
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 12:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

ED

Just taking a break from "another" Birthday party prep... letting the sweat evaporate... cripes I thought portaging was hard?!!!... but, on your trip... what needs most to be done/changed... what was the "most significant" pleasure... what was saddest observance?

None of my business, I know, but I know I tend to define my experience by some of these things?

Thanks
Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 438
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 4:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

The saddest observance was the intrusion of ATV trails in the backcountry.In Chiniguchi, they appear to be almost everywhere. They are also very prevalent along parts of the Sturgeon River.

On the positive side I had a lengthy view of a wolf.I was paddling the downstream on the Upper Sturgeon going around a high gravel bank where I could see a fair distance down the river.
A lone wolf was travelling upstream on my LHS.
Pepper was in the front of the canoe, facing towards me so she was completly oblivious to what I was looking at.I don't think the wolf saw us.It trotted along close to the edge of the embankement as we both approached each other. This process took about a full minute. As it passed by I said hello to it and I think that is when it must have seen us. Also at about that time, Pepper saw it and thinking it was just another big dog, wanted out of the canoe to go and play with it.
It promptly took off into the bush when all this commotion started.
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 97
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 6:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Ed

(I am as we (try to) speak up-to-beyond-elbows,
in something apparently called RAP MUSIC... which, I reckon, any self-respecting Wolf would run from... I insist on giving it a chance. That ran out 2 hours ago... but, tis not MY Birthday Party, and I reckon that "just" one more trip can
possibly make it compensate for the dreams I dread the next few nights. I hope? Lie to me if necesssary, or advised, please).

Lone Wolf... never seen one of those. I've seen many I initially thought as Lone... and they kept doing their business... gave me a Shoulder-Shiver-Over-the Back-I-couldnt-confirm wasn't precise evidence-of-recognition... but after careful intense consideration... confirmed to not be as lonely as initially thought. I've yet to
not disprove the theory they don't troll an "expendable crew member", you know?
And, thank heaven Pepper was in the frontseat,
not drawn off to "play with his new friends",
which I (Very much) have experienced, to thankfully dreamless results.

(i'm about to train a new "amidships-mate", and
I'll work hard to protect him, too)
Still, Wolves, any wildlife... my experience is Moose and Deer and Bears, mostly, in that way... there is (almost) nothing as precious as any creature as oblivious to you, for even a moment, as you were, a moment before, were to it.

I thank you, for todays city-memory you enabled me today. (If you like RAP, I can mail you a free Gift almost immediately?)

ATV's.

What can you recommend, to enable all to enjoy?

I still have a hundred questions on your route, but I'll get to that later... I cant type when the Keys are Bouncing Bigger than My Speakers.

(if you have a Quiet Place Tonight... Savour It)

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 439
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Sunday, May 27, 2007 - 1:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Sundown wrote:
ATV's.
What can you recommend, to enable all to enjoy?


}}
1. Ride on proper hard packed trails where you are permitted to travel and where limited trail and environmental damage can be done.
2. Stay off portages. We don't want them destroyed by huge ruts full of water going through soft spots.
3. If you want to wallow your machine through muck, do it where the rest of us don't have to see the damage. And keep it to one mud hole in the area, and not every potential muddy spot you come to. We know the machines can wallow through mud. You don't need to prove it to yourselves over and over again.
4. Take your empty beer bottles out with you. Don't stand on a bridge and smash them on the rocks below in a river or elsewhere as someone has done on the bridge crossing at Lower Goose Falls on the Sturgeon. Don't put them in a fire pit either and expect them to disappear because you had a big fire. Carry the empties out with you.
5. If you want a closer look at a lake, don't drive down the portage destroying small trees in the process. Turn your machine off and walk the short distance.
6. Stay out of places that don't specifically allow motorized travel, such as along the Sturgeon River Waterway Park in the Temagami area unless you have permission from the Superintendent.

7. If you camp with your machine please take out your garbage when you leave. If you bring in broken down lawn chairs, barbeques, barbeque tanks, old tents, beer in bottles or cans , food in tin cans, fuel cans, oil cans for your machine etc. please take it all back out with you when you leave. None of us want to deal with all this junk out there.
Respect the forest and the solitude that it provides to all of us and keep it clean so the next person who comes along doesn't have to see your mess.
8. Build your bush toilet away from the site so you don't need to use coloured tarps to make it private. The bears will not bother you when you are doing your thing so you don't need it that close.
9. Respect the rights of others to use the backcountry just as we respect your right to use it.
10. Join an ATV club, learn the proper etiquette rules and abide by them.

I think that is a start Sundown.


The picture below was taken at Adelaide Lake in Chiniguchi. It is the last bit of the portage where it goes down to the lake. I couldn’t understand why the small cedars in the centre looked disrupted. I finally realized that some person had driven an ATV down to the lake knocking the trees over on the way down and then knocking them over in the other direction on the way back up. One is still laying on the ground.
If they had wanted to see the lake, why not just get off the machine and walk down to the lake. Why destroy the trees in the middle of the portage by driving over the top of them? This type of behavior makes ATV riders look like Yahoos.

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sundown
Member

Post Number: 99
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 27, 2007 - 3:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Ed, for the time you took, and the detail and direct evidence you provided.

I played a hunch, and checked the OFATV Website,
under policies, and "Rules of Ettiquette". I dont know how to refer the link... but OFATV is enough, I guess.

Anyway, they have a 21 Point Program for Ettiquette, and everything you referenced is actually there, Ed... so your personal thoughts are obviously bang-on.

The OFATV also states they "believe the future of utilizing a trail in the Outdoors tomorrow is directly related to how users use it today".
To me, it seems their Federation is well aware that the yahoos can/might destroy not only the environment, their own credibity, and image, but also lead directly to increasing restrictions and/or bans.

Thank you Ed for your efforts to bring a real-life scenario, and your own carefully-considered thoughts, to this issue.

Sundown
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canoebear
Member

Post Number: 408
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 5:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

"Opener-of-tha-Way"

Lone wolf, howler in tha night,
'twas tha 1 who kept U company
along yer solo pack sack journey.
All that 'tis wild + for-ever free,
'tis "Wild Spirit", symbol of wilderness,
'twas yer guardian guide onto tha secrets
of tha NE bush.
By-way-of leaven paw print to follow in shadows,
'twas a scent marken on fringe boundries of a much "Indian Sacred Keep Place".
Canoe pathfinder, exploren hidden passages into
a nights journey, be awaken to/or bring-to-light'
tha take-out truths, so to share tha occurrence happenen of go-en-ons with tha rest of his Otterhead Clan.
Canoe dog "Pepper" duren dark hours, kept-an-ear-to lone wolf summon howls, to Bear-tha-Way.
Never go into tha deep dark woods alone, Heya ed!



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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 440
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 9:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thank you Canoebear:
Canoe dog Pepper, does do a lot of listening in the night. I require hearing aids, which I take out at night. So I normally sleep soundly and can't hear myself snoring. Apparently, loud enough to keep all the wolves and bears well away from my tent, since none of them have ever visited me during the night... at least as far as I know.

Pepper does however keep an ear open and if she hears a Beaver slap it's tail she is up right away, moving around the tent waking me up in the process.One night on the lower Sturgeon, she was up almost all night long, keeping me awake as well. Neither of us got any sleep that night.
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barbara
Member

Post Number: 25
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 2:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

We met up with a couple on atv's on a backroad outside Algonquin. It was funny to hear them ranting and cursing out....wait for it....atv'ers. How destructive they are, etc.

Maybe Pepper needs her own little canteen of "doggy sleeping aid". ;)

Thanks for taking the time to post your trip log and photos, Ed. Really 'preciate it.

Barbara

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irishfield
Member

Post Number: 119
Registered: 11-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 11:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Great report Ed !

And Barbara dear....where ya been....
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 113
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 2:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ed,

Dumb question from one who hasnt been thru that area, so apology comes first, ok...

but, could you expand and define/describe the
topography or tree-variation, if any, along your route. Is there a dramatic change... trees, shorelines, skylines from put-in to takeout?

Thanks

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 444
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 4:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I would call it all mixed boreal or pre-boreal.
That would be a mix of white and black spruce, red and white pine, jack pine in cut over areas and some eastern white cedar.Also white birch, and some maple in some areas.
In some of the cut over areas there are almost pure stands of aspen. I suspect these have been planted following a clear cut.

Boreal, would consist mostly of white and black spruce with less hardwood and maybe some jackpine interspersed.

The Obabika runs through some low areas to the Sturgeon. The Sturgeon below Lower Goose falls goes predominately through low lands, except for a few areas. At Kelly it has fairly high banks of sand deposits with some clay type soils.Chiniguchi is more of an upland area with lots of rocks in Maskinonge, Matagamasi areas.Going north to Dewdney, Wolf and on into Chiniguchi it is mostly all rock.Particularly Wolf which is surrounded by white granite rock, much like Killarney.North of that is much like Temagami with lots of granite as far up as Stauffer. The Upper Sturgeon is mostly all granite interspersed with drop pools that are surrounded with swampy areas sometimes and granite outcrops more often. Some sections are predominately sand/gravel and these areas have high populations of jack pine.
That is about it. Typical Temagami country except for Wolf Lake which appears to be a bit different.
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 115
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 4:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks Ed

Its what I imagined I guess... whole bunch of everything, eh?

I like the diversity/changing landscape every day,
and it sounds like everyday is a surprise on your route.

Thanks a lot for the info.

Sundown

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