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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

In the north-west region of Ontario is 1 million hectares of Ontario’s richest and most ecologically diverse ecosystems – the Ogoki Boreal Forest. Centuries ago, fur traders paddled their canoes across crystal clear lakes, portaging through old growth forest, thick with jack pine, black spruce and poplar. The conditions were harsh; negotiating the forest path was often treacherous and impassable due to frequent blow-downs and wildfire. Today wildfire and blow-downs are still very much part of the northern boreal, yet these Historic canoe routes have survived, the indelible mark of our ancestors etched deeply into the landscape from hundreds of years of use. Modern day canoe trippers still use these Historic canoe routes to explore the wild, unmanaged forest. Sadly, all of this is at risk of being lost forever.

The Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) plans to clear cut approximately 70,000 hectares within the Ogoki Forest commencing April 2008. The planned areas for harvest boundary several lakes and rivers that form one of several canoe routes in the area including the Kapikotongwa River which is part of the Marshall Lake Canoe Route. Traditionally used by the Ojibway for hunting, fishing, and trapping for over thousands of years, the Marshall Lake Canoe Route is steeped in history. The route offers the keen observer an opportunity to locate pictographs on the steep rocky shores of the deep blue lakes and wide flat rivers. The Woodland Caribou, a threatened species, can still be seen drinking at shore's edge. But now even the Caribou’s habitat is under siege.

Caribou are just one of 21 species that have been identified at risk in the Ogoki Forest. Unless this logging is scaled back, their habitat is projected to fall by 57% over the next 100 years. The MNR‘s public consultation period ends July 8, 2007. It is critical for all Canadians who care about how their land is being managed to voice their opinions NOW before development decisions are finalized. Preserve our heritage! Save the Marshall Lake Canoe Route and protect caribou habitat.

For more information including a form letter for your quick submission please visit the Ogoki Forest Alliance page on the Nastawgan Network at http://www.nastawgan.ca


(Message edited by lady_di on June 10, 2007)
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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Just a Post script to the above message regarding the Ogoki Forest - you can also check out my blog at http://savetheogokiforest.blogspot.com/

Thank you
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 139
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 12:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Lady Di (Ogoki Action-Girl)

You may count on my words, letters, and assistance as required.

Years ago I swallowed smoke on Thunder Bay 46,
a massive Forest Fire in your region. We were
burned out of our tents on multiple occasions
that summer. But we got up every morning, along with innumerable other lads from across this land, and did what we could... working with or against Nature, as conditions enabled. Over my
MNR years, I lost many friends and associates
similarly inclined to similar efforts. Some, I spoke to seconds before on a radio... they never
answered my last transmission.

Silence is deafening, and tragic. And never forgotten. I urge all to do what they may to temper ANY potential they have some capacity to
either effect, or affect. Just my personal view.

To those who may not comprehend, 70000 hectares
is approximately the size of Ottawa. Thunder Bay
46 was the size of Metropolitan Toronto. If we will fight against Natures whims, I wonder why so few join against the whims of Mankind?

Thank you Di, for your efforts, and the efforts
of all associated with your organization.

Sundown
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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks for your support. I will be visiting Ogoki this year travelling the Marshall Lake canoe route.
Recently, the area has been deluged by rainfall so I am hoping things will warm up and stay calm.

Saddened to hear of those who did not make it out.


Cheers
Ogoki Action Girl
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 140
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 1:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Lady Di...(Ogoki Action-Girl)

They didn't make it out... six brave men fell
atop Maple Mountain (Temagami). I fear how few
might remember their commitments and bravery,
so we might enjoy, what we enjoy today?

One brave-heart pilot... (bushpilot on Ottertooth Remembers, I am sure) lost a wing.
One second, here. The next, evermore.
I still call his callsign... as I did then.

I was his wingman... sort of. He was in my care.
And, I weep still.

A dozen or more Junior Rangers and MNR Staff...
I remember not the date, and tragically to my shame, not the names or faces or numbers.
But they all "Went In".

None "Came Out".
All had the courage to "Go In".
And, have my eternal respect, and gratitude.

The MNR has changed drastically over the two generations I have known it. That is why I left.


See the thread above, about
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow... please.
It is my own mission... one, you understand, Diane.

I've lost too many good people.
I respect my Yesterday, and today I live,
as you most obviously do,
to foster a Tomorrow you, I, and they, envisioned... and dared to effect.

My thoughts today,
are with them all.
And, your commitment to our Tomorrows.

Sundown

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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 5
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 5:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yes Sundown I understood your message. I try to imagine what drives those of us to take such risks.

I often flew with my father - not a bush plane mind you. It was a Cessna 172 . A small plane suited for tripping in clear weather. We travelled to Nova Scotia in it and this is probably one of my best childhood memories.

I will check out the other thread. Certainly I hope great things will come for Ogoki. It really is the cradle of life.

Kind regards
Di
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tess
Member

Post Number: 74
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2007 - 8:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ogoki Action-Girl,

Thanks for your inspired work! The blog, links and form letters are great.

i's dotted, fingers crossed

from the kinder gentler side,
tess

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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 6
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 16, 2007 - 6:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hi Tess

It's nice to talk to you again - hope your hound dogs are doing well. I really appreciate your support. Every letter counts.

Yes it seems I have been renamed to OAG - except no red cape or cool tights ....
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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 7
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 16, 2007 - 8:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Bo Derek, Actress and activist ignited some buzz during a visit to Queen’s Park recently to speak about endangered and trafficked species and support the Endangered Species legislation that has been touted by Queen’s Park as the “gold standard” in North America.

Since the Woodland Caribou has a Threatened Status it falls under the provisions of the Act:

"If a species is listed on the Species at Risk in Ontario List as an endangered or threatened species, the Bill prohibits damaging or destroying the habitat of the species."

However, if the government has its way, Northern Ontario will continue to come under the axe next year when the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) plans to clear cut another 70,000 hectares (about the size of the city of Ottawa) in the Ogoki Forest.

Unless this logging is scaled back, caribou habitat is projected to fall by 57% over the next 100 years. I fear it’s going to take a lot more than a visit from Bo to save them.

The MNR’s public consultation period ends July 8, 2007.

Download a letter of support to send to the MNR - take 5 minutes and include your own views on the plans for logging in Ogoki

www.nastawgan.ca/Ogoki/Ogoki_MNR_letter.pdf

Thank you!
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 160
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2007 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Lady Di

This mornings paper stated over 20 native bird species are in serious freefall decline as a result of rapidly declining Boreal Forest.

A few species in threatened status are the Chickadee, the Ruffed Grouse, all sparrow species, and the Grosbeak families.

My point here, is that it is no longer just what
most of us might consider as the "more exotic" species. Its hitting our everyday associates hard too.

Sundown
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lady_di
Member

Post Number: 8
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, June 29, 2007 - 6:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Now, with only 10 days remaining until the public consultation period ends...each day I will provide one of

THE TOP 10 REASONS TO SEND A LETTER TO THE MNR TO SAVE OGOKI


#10 Part of the provincial government’s $75 million subsidy for logging roads will be used in Ogoki for roads that access parts of the forest that are not approved for harvest within 2008-2018 planning period.

One such road is planned to go through the Attwood Conservation Reserve which is supposed to be protected. It is being done to allow logging trucks access to areas of harvest outside of the reserve.

Public tax dollars are being used to fund roads - people have a right to decide if this money is being used judiciously.

Here is the link to download the letter

www.nastawgan.ca/Ogoki/Ogoki_MNR_letter.pdf
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lady_di
Member
Post Number: 9
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 30, 2007 - 7:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

#9 Some 1,500 scientists from more than 50 countries around the world urged Canadian governments to protect the country's 566.6 million-hectare boreal forest.

The forest — described by the researchers in an open letter as one of the world's last remaining and largest intact forest and wetland ecosystems — is a major source of fresh water in North America, home to billions of animals and important to the livelihood of First Nations communities, they noted

According to the researchers, the boreal forest is threatened by logging, mining, oil and gas operations and other activities, and will continue to be at risk unless federal, provincial and territorial governments increase the area that enjoys protected status from the current 10 per cent to at least 50 per cent ...


Download a letter of support to send to the MNR:

www.nastawgan.ca/Ogoki/Ogoki_MNR_letter.pdf

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