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Archive through April 4, 2010fireman25 04-4-10  5:27 pm
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erhard
Member

Post Number: 17
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 4, 2010 - 5:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

"I don't have any food scraps as my portable garbage disposal unit is usually with me..."

I think that "unit" is even one better: it is self-propelled....
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 77
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Sunday, April 4, 2010 - 6:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Wild Child, I have never used the outback though i have camped and enjoyed the labor of others who do. We bake pizza, and buns using the frying pan with the lid from the big pot as a top.

Cake is made in a double boiler. We use our large pot with 3-4 flat rocks placed on the bottom then add a cup or two of water. Place a smaller pot with the batter in it on top of the rocks. Put the lid on the smaller pot then place large lid on top to seal the boiler. We bake either by fire or on stove top. You have to keep an eye on the water level and add more accordingly so as not burn the pot. Baking times vary but count on at least 30-45 min.

Not many barista's in my neck of the woods, but we take great pleasure in turning down free coffee (most of the time) with a "we pay for ours" especially when the police are in ear shot.

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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 793
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Sunday, April 4, 2010 - 7:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yeah Erhard. My garbage disposal unit has both full time four wheel drive and a large appendage that works much like a windshield wiper blade.
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erhard
Member

Post Number: 18
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, April 5, 2010 - 6:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

"...and a large appendage that works much like a windshield wiper blade."
Warms your heart on those long solo trips!
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pine_sap
Member

Post Number: 47
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Monday, April 5, 2010 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

quoted from fireman's post

"Does it have to be wood?
Also, is it a specific chant or will a Latin prayer work, as well?"

Fireman, i suppose a glopper spoon could be used as well, but i find wood gets the perfect resonance to get the grounds to settle ;)

As for the chant... what ever is in your heart will work... the coffee gods are not picky.

(Message edited by pine_sap on April 5, 2010)
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preacher
Member

Post Number: 107
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Monday, April 5, 2010 - 12:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Instant coffee is an abomination in any circumstance.

I have a percolator as well as a single cup drip rig. Both make a fine cup of coffee. I like to have at least two cups in the morning, helps jump start the plumbing.

Percolator is awesome imo. Done many trips with this as my one and only pot. Never noticed much coffee taste in my cooking and the bloopbloop is the perfect alarm for when water is boiling. Overfill in the morning. Make oatmeal with the overfill, then drop the coffee basket in - it's ready when the oatmeal is finished.

Grounds and filters and my garbage processes are the same method as Ed. Coffee grounds are not a food smell issue imo, no bear/critter worries.

One buddy swears by the MSR pressbot, but it's more fiddling & no real gain imo. Flip this, fold that, screw it together and you've got a boiling hot nalgine to pour from. My perc has a handle and no moving parts to worry about.

Tableware? I pack a double walled mug and a squishy bowl. A single lexan spoon, no fork and my knife is on my belt. All my meals can be eaten with a spoon or hands. The closest thing to a plate I bring is a paddle.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 78
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Monday, April 5, 2010 - 11:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I am in the throws of full on Spring fever. My symptoms include incessant thoughts of distant northern country, fiddling with equipment, plotting and revising spring routes and grinding up coffee several times to duplicate this micro-ground starbucks stuff, as suggested by fireman, not bad but a mouth full of grounds. Only known cure is to get outside and stay outside. One other debilitating symptom is reading too much canoe porn. Itís an infliction I am willing to put up with every spring.

First, I have a confession. I have never drunk instant coffee on a trip, ever. However, in the process of tweaking the family outfit (our kids are under the age of 3 and 7), we stumbled upon an article in an outdoor magazine about this instant (starbucks) coffee. So the wife picked up a couple of packs and we sampled it over the fall and winter. Making it in our camping mugs we figured out the appropriate amount of coffee that works best for our tastes. Strong, hot and good, not great. The kicker is that we go from carrying a large zip lock bag of coffee grounds for a weeks worth to less than a ľ of a bag of packets. This reduction in size is substantial, coupled with other space saving methods and we are able to leave the 60 l barrel at home and get by with using a 30 l barrel plus a small wannigan stuffed into our food/equipment pack. Good for seven days worth of provisions. We eat well. It seems most of you are past the kiddie stage, donít have any, and for some donít want any. But as a parent when we portage there is one less barrel to carry. And there are no grounds. This is HUGE. No sacrifice here because I use instant coffee, it is not a religious experience. Get over it! It is all about family time. As for grounds, when I carry them I burn them every day I can along with any other tidbits of stuff. Not fanatical about it, but I donít leave nothing behind, except my s----.

By the way I am a dyed in the wool Bill Mason disciple and have been since 8 y/o. Most if not all my methods stem from his teachings, tweaked over the years by changing technology and resourcefulness.

Time for a cold coors light to kick this fever to the curb.

The beer snobs must be shaking their heads!
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 60
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 6, 2010 - 12:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Ghost Brigade, sounds like you are a fellow firefighter. And,we do sometimes pay. But enough of that. Your spring fever is being felt by everyone. I have bumped my Magnetewan trip up by a month. seems like perfectly good canoe weather.
As for little ones, just one, 20, and she was taking a Dumoine through the upper boulder garden of the North Channel of the Lady Evelyn when she was eleven. It is about them. Now I take her and seven of her legally drinking, bottomless appetite friends for a week and the kitchen considerations are mind boggling. But there are a lot of backs to carry. The fact that they bring cases of beer kind of sets the tone of the trip.
Personally, for large groups I use a home made wannigan with a built in back/hip harness. It fits snugly under the thwart, provides a comfortable seat for two bums and the top lifts off presenting everything at once. I use several identical thin nalgene 1 liter square containers that nest perfectly, so if a bit of water does get in, nothing is damaged. Never been a fan of barrels as they roll on my spine and I do not like digging around in them,altough there advantages are obvious and they provide a nice stool as well.
Any type of coffee will do, even Coor's Light if there is no beer around. Point is to get paddling.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 79
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 9:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

On the job and climbing a lot closer to that 85 factor.
Your a lucky guy to still be tripping with your daughter, my guys are another season away from getting to play in my Dumoine. As for those barrels I agree it is frustrating digging around for stuff in them. No matter how organized i try to set them up they eventually require a full barrel dive to retrive something. As for it rolling around on the back Ostroms voyageur harness is sweet.
I was past the Mag on easter and it was flowing decent but below normal conditions for this time of year at the #69 bridge. At least that part of the province had a decent amount of snow this winter.
Have fun.
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 61
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 8:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

OK, Brother, I have to ask. Where do you work and how long you been on???
I'm original City of Toronto, class of '89. Working at Yonge and College, Grosvenor Station 314. Nice to know there are brothers out there paddling amongst the humanoids.
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 797
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 9:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

There might be others out there also Fireman.
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 62
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

the more the merrier, Ed.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 80
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 10:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

City of Woodstock via Sudbury, also Started in '89. Besides Curly, I know of at least two other lurkers.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 81
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

by the way my number will actually be 82 and hopefully it goes down to 80 when i paddle off into the sunset.
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 798
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 - 11:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Fireman:
There may be a few of your cousins lurking around here. I would call them "smokey bears".
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 65
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Thursday, April 8, 2010 - 9:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I met a Woodstock firefighter in New York City during the big memorial in 2002. He was in seventh heaven. Everyone in the bar was buying him drinks. Last I saw him he had a corona in each hand, one in each pant pocket and he was standing on a table dancing.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 83
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Thursday, April 8, 2010 - 10:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I was at the memorial also and know exactly who you are talking about. He is a wee bit bigger than your average leprechaun but carries on with the best of them.

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fireman
Member

Post Number: 66
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Friday, April 9, 2010 - 7:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Small world, then again, when you drive around in a big red truck and act like a six year-old, people tend to remember who you are.
I do not think there is a career better suited to facillitating canoe tripping than firefighting. The problem comes when other friends who want to trip have to figure out how to parse their three weeks of annual vacation time between Temagami and family.
I've gone with other firefighters a lot and shortened my trips to accommodate my other friends.
I usually head out around September 12 and return after Thanksgiving and spend the interim lost in Temagami and wet in Killarney. It seems like the life of a multi-millionaire to me.
Lot of toronto brothers live out in Woodstock, I am sure they are well known, if only for not tipping at restaurants.
take care. White stuff on the ground this morning in the Beaver Valley. Lots of rain, to boot.
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 84
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Friday, April 9, 2010 - 8:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

six degrees of seperation.

I could not agree with you more about ff being the perfect career for canoeing. Except for maybe the retired guys and school teachers.

When i chose firefighting to be my career it was after a very enlightning summer of living in the woods and canoe tripping as a junior ranger. I wanted to get on with mnr fire control. Though my foreman were encouraging, i realized it was a tough go getting on full time. I had just turned 17 and realized for the first time that i wanted to work as a ff in a city. Crazy hours, but lots of time off. I have paddled over the years with a bunch of the guys from work and still do. I trip regularily with one. Most of the guys want to base it or travel easy, which is great but some times it is hard to get away from the congestion.

Yeah there are a lot of brothers working in different cities living in woodstock and i know a few of them. Just putting the toques on the kiddies and heading them off to school, what day is it anyway?!
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ghost_brigade
Member

Post Number: 85
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Friday, April 9, 2010 - 9:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

... back from the playground. Early spring and mid september are my favourite times to get out there. Stomping in the same areas as you, and been kicking along on a bunch of different routes around the NE-W, one truly could spend a life time of paddling in ontario alone!
Its a good life and I am thankful for each and every day of it.
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fireman
Member

Post Number: 67
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Friday, April 9, 2010 - 10:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

close friends are from Sudbury, also worked MNR forest fire fighting. Cam McEchearan, Jeff
Myles, Jerry Cheaumont, more whose names escape me. All TFD now. Cam's wife's family owns Golden Pizza in Sudbury, if you know the place.
you sound like a kindred spirit, drop by 314 anytime.
Also, not sure but I think it is Friday, one of the April ones??
We're heading up to the Magnetewan in May, all firemen. have a good weekend.
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ghost_brigade
Member
Post Number: 86
Registered: 04-2004


Posted on Friday, April 9, 2010 - 4:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

dined often at Golden Pizza growing up, Long Lake Rd, but not for years.
The same goes for you if you are down this way, stop in anytime 251 Vansittart Ave stn #2.
Still snowing on and off lightly here, we could only be so lucky to get a huge dump of snow or rain that puts another 12 inches on the ground. For sure a good time on the magnetawan, have a good one.
cheers

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