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Archive through April 30, 2007tsm25 04-30-07  8:32 pm
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 19
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 1, 2007 - 9:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

TSM,

It is one beat up canoe, but I honestly think it's a lot worse than it looks. The bottom is quite scratched but the vast majority of those are superficial and will be remedied with a fresh coat of paint once the 'repairs' are complete. Still unsure as to what exactly I'm going to do, but that's what lazy summer weekends are for, isnt it.
And yes, the boat is still in great shape considering what it went through. Don't forget, it still floats! But only turns left.

Burt
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john_v
Member

Post Number: 67
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Thursday, May 3, 2007 - 4:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

callmeishmael,

I'm curious.... Did you register with that name before, or after, April 16?
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dendrast
Member

Post Number: 29
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2007 - 9:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Aaah- all those plastic boats are rinkydink.
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 29
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, June 22, 2007 - 10:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Dendrast,

Sounds like someone is itching for a discussion of the merits of a kevlar vs. wood vs. aluminium boat. Personally, on long treks, I find a kevlar boat to be a total lifesaver on long portages. Sure, a Grumman is more durable, but having to lift that kind of weight up and down on a 10-portage day leaves the muscles in much worse shape. The ultralight kevlar I'm not such a huge fan of, I found them just a little loose in the water.

Burt
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simonb
Member

Post Number: 6
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 2:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I agree with burtjames. The ultralight kevlars are way too flexible to be comfortable. I know many people think I'm crazy, but I still use a cedarstrip canoe (Not Cedar Canvas). It is heavier than kevlar (55lbs), but it is very rigid which makes it excellent to paddle and fish from. One advantage to making your own canoe, is you inherit the skills to repair it during the process. The canoe in the photo lasted 7 years averaging around 20 days on the water each year before needing any serious repair. This year I added another layer of fiberglass to the outside, and it should be good now for another 10 years.

Simon
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 30
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 3:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Simon,

If we could all build boats like that there would be no Kevlar! That's a beautiful piece of work right there. The question is .... would you be willing to take that thing trekking? I average about 20 days a year of backcountry camping plus a great deal of fishing and other water-based activities. I just couldn't see myself lugging something so nice down a 5k portage.
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simonb
Member

Post Number: 7
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2007 - 4:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

This is the canoe I use on all tandem trips whether Algonquin, Verendrye, Temagami, or elsewhere. It is the canoe we used in Temagami 4 weeks ago, on a 9 day trip I posted in the canoe routes section. The longest portage on that trip was 3 Km. It has also crossed the infamous Bonfield-Dickson portage (5500m) in Algonquin on 3 seperate trips.

It definitely hurts when you hit the first rock after a new coat of varnish. But, after 7 years of tripping, it only had 3 scratches through the glass requiring patches.

Simon

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tsm
Member

Post Number: 109
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2007 - 7:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Beautiful canoe Simon!
Love the fishfinder and rod-holders too. Awesome
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 33
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, June 29, 2007 - 8:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

At 55 lbs I suppose your canoe is still lighter than many of the rental boats one would find in Algonquin/Temagami/wherever. Either way, if you could sense jealousy through a message boards I'm betting there would be oodles of it coming through from all the members here.
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burtjames
Member

Post Number: 51
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, September 11, 2007 - 2:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I finally bought a boat, an Alchemist Legend Prospector. I realize that I spent some time trash-talking prospector boats but I think I'm going the way of 2 boats ... 1 for whitewater and the other a more multi-purpose boat. I got a great end-of-season deal on the Alchemist as well ... now just to find some time to get out and paddle it.

Burt
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shutter_speed
Member

Post Number: 22
Registered: 02-2007


Posted on Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 9:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Has anyone had any experience with the newish "Golden Brawn" ultralight from Scott Canoes? The "infused kevlar" process they talk about apparently results in a rigid and tough canoe, although I expect it's still pretty loose in the water. I'd appreciate any comments from those who might know it.
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sundown
Member

Post Number: 280
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, January 17, 2008 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

shutterspeed

No experience... although Rhonda at Scott is a pretty reliable source... known for telling it like it is.

This tech is interesting, I agree...
See www.bluewatercanoes.com/News.htm

(and, no more worries over paint scratches, eh TSM? )

Regards

Sundown
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ed
Moderator

Post Number: 521
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 8:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Shutter speed:
It looks as if Scott has finally bought in to a process that uses vacuum impregnation to fill the void spaces around the laminate.
Nova Craft in London has been using this process for almost 20 years now to build their Kevlar and Glass canoes.It provides a canoe with a higher strength to weight ratio, by essentially building a laminate with almost no void spaces left in it, something that was very difficult to achieve with the traditional hand lay-up method they have been using.You might want to visit the Nova Craft website and see how their Kevlar boats compare to the ones Scott is now producing.
These very lightweight Kevlar boats do oil can and take a bit of getting used to, especially if you have been used to a traditional cedar strip with planks and ribs.
But they don't take to bouncing off rocks. Small microcracks form in the laminate and after a while they become evident.But they make a great boat for lake travel and modest rapid running.
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tsm
Member

Post Number: 135
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 12:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Sundown
I don't worry 'bout the scratches any longer. After the inaugural Scarecrow/Montreal River trip, 2 weeks at the cottage on Temagami, a week long camping trip on Charleston Lake, and a week long trip in Algonquin's north, she has plenty of scratches.
Can't speak about the Golden Brawn, but our BW in infused Kevlar is not only tough and fairly light, but is easy on the eyes as well.
In some ways, I wish I had gotten a canoe with no gelcoat, but I much prefer the looks of a red canoe, even if it does show scratches a bit more!
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shutter_speed
Member

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2007


Posted on Saturday, January 19, 2008 - 6:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I went up to see the golden brawn yesterday. It's amazingly light at 39 pounds,and I guess it is strong, but it sure looks flimsy. With no gelcoat it comes in one colour only (yellowish), and you can see forms through the sides. But it is so light, and I am getting older, so I am looking forward to trying it out in the spring!
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shutter_speed
Member
Post Number: 39
Registered: 02-2007


Posted on Monday, October 26, 2009 - 7:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

We ended up getting a 16ft6in Langford Prospector Legend (ultralight kevlar) last spring. We are very happy with it. It has a (blue) gelcoat-and now has LOTS of scratches. It travels well with a load. Not as pretty as Simon's, but we love it!

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