Forums Forums Help/Rules Help Edit Profile My Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search  
Ottertooth Forums * North northwest * "Barren-land" rivers, anyone? < Previous Next >

Author Message
 Link to this message

four_eyez
Member

Post Number: 28
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Saturday, April 2, 2005 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

A favorite book of my shelf is "Discovering Eden" by Alex Hall, which truly invokes the wonder and beauty of such rivers as the Thelon, and many others in the "Barren Lands".I'm just opening this up out of curiosity: has anyone here ever paddled rivers north of the "treeline", specifically in Nunavat and NWT?
Further-more, has anyone ever witnessed Caribou migrations?
Story-telling is truly an amazing thing, and anyone has anything to tell, please do so.
 Link to this message

rkgroff
Member

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 2:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

http://rkgroff.tripod.com/riverweb/tlon.htm

I did the Thelon River trip in 2002 with 5 friends. See the web pages for details
 Link to this message

barbara
Member

Post Number: 16
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 10:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Adam, sometimes it takes us old-timers a while to clue in. :-(

Check out Rolf Kraiker's website. You can do a lot of "exploring" there. A quote that may entice you: "We spent a day with a herd of over 100,000 caribou."
http://www.blazingpaddles.on.ca/

Also, over at CCR, do a search for posts by HOOP_
I think you may be interested in some of his adventures. :-) They may inspire you. I sure wish he would get a website going, or a book.

barbara
 Link to this message

four_eyez
Member

Post Number: 44
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 5:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Hey, thanks for the input Barabara. I'll for sure check out that site as well as that person on CCR. I've been sitting here, speculating about how amazing it would be to trip around out there; in a couple of years to come that is.

And "rkgroff," nice pictures and trip report.
 Link to this message

bush_pilot
Member

Post Number: 63
Registered: 03-2004


Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 2:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Four eye's

I flew over a huge herd in a helicopter, the Kaminiriak? herd I think it was called, and I'm guessing at the spelling, it was a while ago 1984. The herd had to be at least 100,000, probably the most amazing sight of a summer filled with amazement in the barrenlands (A misnomer if ever there was one.)
 Link to this message

onlypassnthru
Member

Post Number: 19
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 3:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

In some of Farley Mowat's books; Never Cry Wolf, and People of the Deer, he gives pretty good descriptions of caribou migrations. The books are a good read too.

(Message edited by onlypassnthru on April 27, 2005)
 Link to this message

paul_hammersten
Member

Post Number: 184
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 3:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Your right canoebear, I sure would like to see a caribou migration.

I enjoyed reading THE ARCTIC PRAIRIES - A Canoe Journey of 2,000 Miles In Search of the Caribou written by Ernest Thompson Seton around 1910-1911.

Your summer in the barrenlands must have been neat Bush Pilot!

Best

Paul
 Link to this message

four_eyez
Member
Post Number: 45
Registered: 01-2005


Posted on Sunday, May 1, 2005 - 6:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Yeah. In this book "Discovering Eden" by Alex Hall, he gives pretty good accounts of sitting around in a campsite, going for a hike, or simply paddling... and all of the sudden a 20,000 large grouping of Caribou walking along on an intersecting route. Some amazing descriptions in it, i must say. I have also heard accounts from some freinds who paddled in the Anderson River area last summer; they didn't see anyof the large migration herds, but rather just a "small" group that were grazing this one area- they still filled up a large valley and numbered in the 100s.

There just seem to be many aspects of the barrenlands that would make it amazing to paddle through...

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
Only registered users may post messages here. If you have cookies enabled, your username and password will automatically appear in the boxes. Register
Password:
Action:

Forums | Last Day | Last Week | Search | User List | Help/Rules Home