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Ottertooth Forums * Temagami canoe routes & backcountry travel * Report: Obabika, Wakamika, Pinetorch, Diamond! < Previous Next >

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heatherlynne7
Member

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2017
Posted on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 3:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

An amazing 3 weeks spent tripping through Temagami in the Summer of 2015. Find some navigational details, descriptive words and pretty pictures on my blog at:

http://www.watermarkwords.org/2015/08/temagami-par t-one/

Enjoy! And let me know what you think :-)
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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 1803
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 9:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks for posting. Those times of confusion and uncertainty (Nasmith) when you feel stuck are always a disappointment. You are tough to be tripping in June, but you got great weather, and a bonus saw Hap and Andrea!
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eddy_turn
Member

Post Number: 101
Registered: 03-2011


Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 1:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Heatherlynne, thanks for the report! Sometimes apparently unfortunate travels become good memories - and memories last much longer than trips. I remember loosing my portage on Pinetorch creek, sleeping in a marsh and having to embarrassingly re-route my trip - and in a hindsight it made for very memorable journey. It might be a prudent thing after all that you did not test your strained ankle on the Nasmith portage, but had a three-week admirable journey to share with us.
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grncnu
Member

Post Number: 427
Registered: 08-2010
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2017 - 1:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

Great trip report and pictures! If I had a tip it would be to always carry the 1:50000 topo maps which have a level of detail that other maps don't, especially useful in places like Nasmith Creek.
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heatherlynne7
Member

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2017
Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 2:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Brian and Eddy_turn I definitely agree that the hardest parts of canoe trips make for the best stories and memories! The definition of adventure for me is havering something to overcome. And we still had a wonderful trip! Thanks for sharing :-)

Grncnu: good tip! On this trip and all the trips we've taken since I've discovered that the maps that we have really aren't sufficient. Topo maps are the way to go... we also may invest in a GPS. I love being old school but, especially as we're planning to go deeper and deeper in the bush, safety comes first!
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brian
Moderator

Post Number: 1804
Registered: 02-2004


Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

I should add (and toot my moose horn) that the published maps are largely copied from others (by folks who may not even know Temagami very well), so they accumulate the errors of others. The maps here on Ottertooth are only added after reliable travel over them, AND they are digital so they are updated, or corrected, regularly. So they may contradict other maps.

They are not a substitute for topos, but a complement.

Yes, we haven't covered all of Temagami yet, but those done are the most reliable -- toot, toot.
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eddy_turn
Member

Post Number: 102
Registered: 03-2011


Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

I traveled most of the areas covered by Ottertooth, aka Brian's, maps and never found myself lost except when I didn't pay enough attention to them maps. They are well worth being printed at the largest possible scale, since they include some minute and very precisely drawn features. On the other hand small-scale prints often allow for some extra adventure in the field.
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grncnu
Member

Post Number: 428
Registered: 08-2010
Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

As Brian says, no route map, however accurate and up to date, is a substitute for a topo map- they complement each other. And I do agree that the Ottertooth maps are the best route maps.
Topo maps have contours (and contour intervals) which show topography. So you can be in the middle of Lake Temagami and get an accurate compass bearing on any high point (to find the shortest distance somewhere, or your actual location by triangulation)- or you can look at a portage and accurately estimate the vertical rise or fall, or you can identify your position on a meandering creek by noting a cliff face.
Topo maps also have a 1km grid, which makes it easy to estimate distances especially in lake travel, as well as providing a "grid north" for short-distance compass bearings.
Finally, the greater scale and detail provide references (small inflowing creeks, marshy areas, adjacent features like oxbow lakes, etc.) which are useful in navigation.
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heatherlynne7
Member

Post Number: 4
Registered: 01-2017
Posted on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 12:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

All good points! I must admit, we haven't used ottertooth maps yet. We've been working off 'published maps' as you call them ;) and have found one especially to be very inaccurate. I had heard that these maps copy from other people and I found that really upsetting... I'm new to the canoeing community so I'm still figuring out how to discuss this without stepping on any toes!

Grncnu I'm super interested in learning how to triangulate. Not only is it fascinating to me, it keeps me free from tech out in the bush, where I go to get free from tech! Lol
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grncnu
Member

Post Number: 429
Registered: 08-2010
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2017 - 1:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post

As I just found out myself, it's actually called "position resection", not triangulation. Here's a link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resection_(orientation)
You need to be able to identify 2 known locations on the map (say a high point of topography and the tip of an island). Take compass bearings to each location and plot these 2 angled lines on the map using the compass as a protractor with grid north as 0 degrees. Where the lines intersect is your location.
If you're searching for a precise location (buried treasure) you'll have to take into account the difference between Grid North and Magnetic North, or "declination" which is given on the maps and changes depending on the map's latitude (distance from the North Pole- or South Pole if you're in Australia).
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heatherlynne7
Member
Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2017
Posted on Saturday, February 4, 2017 - 8:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post

Thanks grncnu! So nice of you to go to the trouble. I will definitely look that link up.

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